Florida Teen Arrested For Wrestling A Fake Alligator 1 Week After Arrest For RKOing Principal

Gianny Sosa-Hernandez, an 18-year-old student at Miami Southridge Senior High School, was arrested on Monday, April 15 at a Miami-Dade County mall for damaging a display and wrestling a fake alligator. Sosa-Hernandez was charged with criminal mischief, according to ABC News.

The arrest comes one week after Sosa-Hernandez had to make a court appearance for attempting to land an RKO on his principal.

Apparently a huge fan of the WWE and Superstar Randy Orton, Sosa-Hernandez once again attempted to break out his wrestling moves. This time, it was on a fake alligator that was on display.

From the report:

In the video, Sosa-Hernandez, 18, is seen removing his sweatshirt and running to the side of the display. He then jumps over the barrier, throwing the fake alligator off a rock and into the display’s pond. Sosa-Hernandez picks up the alligator before performing a wrestling move on it that police identified as an R.K.O, a move popularized by WWE wrestler Randy Orton. He then pretends to pin the gator.

The alligator was reportedly valued at $3,690.

Following the incident with his principal at the high school, Sosa-Hernandez was charged. His family has since said that they feel the punishment was excessive.

“It feels like he’s being charged with something he does not deserve. My brother is a nice guy and all he wanted was play around and make people feel happy about themselves,” his brother Mike Sosa told CBS Miami.

The school even commented on the situation, saying: “It’s unfortunate that anyone would instigate a situation for self-promotion that could bring harm to others. Instances of disruptive and threatening behavior will be handled swiftly and result in severe consequences. In addition to an arrest, the student’s lack of judgment will result in disciplinary actions in accordance with our Code of Student Conduct.”

We have to wonder whether Sosa-Hernandez has finally learned his lesson and if he will avoid any RKO-related arrests and incidents moving forward.

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