George Takei Net Worth 2018: How Much Is Takei Worth Now?

George Takei attends the 25th Annual GLAAD Media Awards

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Famous Star Trek actor George Takei just made headlines as he is accused of sexual assault on a former actor and male model, who claimed Takei drugged him and when he awoke his pants were off and he was being groped. This comes after only 11 days since Takei condemned Kevin Spacey for the sexual assault allegations leveled against him. Takei has denied any wrongdoing, saying that he is “shocked and bewildered” by the acquisition, and says that the incident “simply did not occur.”

“When power is used in a non-consensual situation, it is a wrong,” Takei said. “For Anthony Rapp, he has had to live with the memory of this experience of decades ago. For Kevin Spacey, who claims not to remember the incident, he was the older, dominant one who had his way. Men who improperly harass or assault do not do so because they are gay or straight — that is a deflection. They do so because they have the power, and they chose to abuse it.”

Let’s find out how much money George Takei has. All his accuser says he wants is an apology from Takei. So, that means the Star Trek actor’s many millions doesn’t have the potential to be threatened in a court of law. But how many millions exactly?

George Takei Net Worth as of 2018: $12 Million

The world-famous Star Trek actor has accumulated a large amount of moolah in his bank account. He’s been acting for over 60 years, after first providing voice-over work for 1950s Japanese monsters films, such as Godzilla Raids Again a.k.a. Gigantis the Fire Monster. However, he received his greatest measure of success as Captain Sulu from the 1960s hit sci-fi program Star Trek. He’s very popular on social media nowadays, with over 10 million likes for his personal Facebook page.


A Look At George Takei’s Career

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George Takei started off his career as a voiceover actor for Japenese monster films, such as Godzilla Raids Again a.k.a. Gigantis the Fire Monster. Throughout the late ’50s and ’60s, Takei appeared in a number of films and television shows, including Hell to Eternity (1960), The Twilight Zone (“The Encounter,” 1964), Ice Palace (1960), Walk, Don’t Run (1966), Mission Impossible (1966), and more.

In 1965, Takei was cast to play Lt. Hikaru Sulu in the second pilot of the soon-to-be cult classic sci-fi TV series Star Trek. He played the role of Sulu from 1966 to 1969, and then again from 1973 to 1974 in Star Trek: The Animated Series. He became Commander Sulu in the film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982). He received the rank of captain in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991).

Takei has appeared in six feature-length Star Trek films, such as Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991).


More About Takei

In 1973, George Takei ran for political office as a Democrat on the Los Angeles Council. Takei lost the election with 33 percent of the vote but remained in politics well into the 21st century promoting LGBT rights and Democratic political candidates. In 1980, he ran for California State Assemblyman (District 46) from the greater Los Angeles area but later dropped out after his opponent complained that airings of Star Trek violated the Federal Communication Commission’s Fairness Doctrine “equal time” regulations.

He served on the board of directors for the Southern California Rapid Transit District from 1973 to 1984. His team planned and set the wheels in motion for the creation of the Los Angeles subway system. He even left the set of Star Trek: The Motion Picture to vote on the construction of Los Angeles subway system in what would become a tie-breaking vote.

Takei is also a published author, as he co-wrote the science-fiction novel Mirror Friend, Mirror Foe in 1979 with his friend Robert Asprin.

After Star Trek, Takei has appeared on a number of TV shows, including Scrubs, Futurama (2012-2013), Will & Grace (2006), The Big Bang Theory (2010), Scrubs (“My Best Friend’s Wedding,” 2004), Archer (2012, 2014), Bojack Horseman, Adventure Time (2010, 2012).

He has also appeared in a large number of movies following his success as Sulu from Star Trek. Some of these films, including Mulan (1998), Entourage (2015), You Don’t Mess with the Zohan (2008), Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword (2009), Mulan II (2004), and of course To Be Takei (2014).


George Takei’s Sexual Assault Allegations: Full Story

Takei is now being accused by Scott R. Brunton of drugging him and later sexually assaulting him in 1981. He said that they met at a bar, and Takei was consoling him after he broke up with his boyfriend. After they talked, they returned to Takei’s apartment for drinks, and after consuming more alcohol he began โ€œfeeling very disoriented and dizzyโ€ and thought he โ€œwas going to pass out,โ€ according to an interview with The Hollywood Reporter.

At the time, Brunton was 23 years old, while Takei was 43 or 44 years of age.

“The next thing I remember I was coming to and he had my pants down around my ankles and he was groping my crotch and trying to get my underwear off and feeling me up at the same time, trying to get his hands down my underwear,” Brunton told The Hollywood Reporter. “I came to and said, ‘What are you doing?!’ I said, ‘I don’t want to do this.’โ€

Bunton was able to escape Takei’s apartment despite alleged pleas for him to “relax” and “get comfortable.”

Takei has denied any wrongdoing, saying that he is “shocked and bewildered” by the accusation, and says that the incident “simply did not occur.”

 


2018

George Takei reprises as the brother in this staging, to be helmed by EWP’s artistic director Snehal Desai, at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center’s Aratani Theatre.

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