Michigan Universities Rejects Proposal 1 & Warns Students To Not Smoke

Not long ago, we heard about our neighbor up north legalizing weed to its people, causing the amount of weed in that country to drop dangerously low. Catching steam of that in the states, it lit up the already progressive movement to legalize what was once called the devil’s lettuce. That’s right. We are talking about weed, marijuana, bud, or any colloquial label you would slap onto its scientific name. But though many states are seeing the benefits of marijuana, not everyone is feeling the high.


What Is Happening?

Michigan has become the latest state to legalize marijuana in a vote that came out to be in favor of it in a 56-44 percent margin. Though many people are happy with the results, some communities and institutions are saying no to marijuana. College officials at campuses across the state have cited that even though marijuana is officially becoming legal next month for people 21 and over, that practice will not be tolerated on campus.

Michigan State University is one of the prestigious school in Michigan to address it. In a memo to students, Detroit Free Press cites:

“We would like to remind everyone that this new state law will not change policies prohibiting the use or possession of marijuana on any property owned or managed by MSU, and by MSU’s faculty, staff, or students on any MSU property or during off-campus MSU business or events,” Denise Maybank, vice president and associate provost at Michigan State University in East Lansing, wrote in a memo to students, faculty and staff Monday evening.

“Employees and students who violate university policy prohibiting the use or possession of illegal drugs on campus will continue to be subject to legal and disciplinary action,” the memo added.

Michigan universities to students: Don't bring your weed on campus https://t.co/cMTHvz3dQu

— Detroit Free Press (@freep) November 13, 2018

A few other universities such as Wayne State University and Central Michigan University have also joined the resistance against weed.

Ted Montgomery, a spokesman for Wayne State University, said they have no plans of deterring from their stance to continue complying with the federal law on prohibiting marijuana use and possession on campus.

President Bob Davies of Central Michigan University also noted in a memo. 

“The use or possession of marijuana is still not allowed on university properties or in the conduct of university business away from campus. Using, distributing and possessing marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Our campus policies comply with federal law.”

So for any potheads in any Michigan universities who are looking to take a trip to cloud 9, take it somewhere else cause it’s not worth getting in trouble for.


What Is Important About Proposal 1?

Michigan says YES to Proposal 1 – officially becoming the tenth state in America to legalize recreational cannabis, and the first in Midwest.

Congratulations #Michigan we love y'all. 🇺🇸 💚💨 #legalizeit pic.twitter.com/RbLgxmyTAK

— High Times (@HIGH_TIMES_Mag) November 7, 2018

Michigan passed Proposal 1 on November 6, making marijuana legal for those 21 and older in the state.

According to Ballotpedia, individuals 21 years of age or older are allowed to possess, use, transport, or process 2.5 ounces or less of marijuana or 15 grams of marijuana. Each individual is allowed to grow a limit of 12 marijuana plants, for as long as the plants are kept away from a public place, and store up to 10 ounces of marijuana from the plants for personal use.

Individuals are also allowed to share or transfer without payment up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana to other persons 21 years of age or older. Being under the influence of marijuana remains illegal while driving motor vehicles, aircraft, motorboats, off-road recreational vehicles, or snowmobiles. Smoking marijuana is still illegal in all public places.

To learn more about your rights regarding marijuana, here is the best site.

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