Kappa Sigma Theta Fraternity Kicked Off Texas State University Campus

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The Kappa Sigma Theta fraternity at Texas State University has decided not to return to the Interfraternity Council after reviewing the administration’s new rules.

Following the death of fraternity pledge Matthew Ellis, a 20-year-old Phi Kappa Psi pledge that passed away in November, Texas State University formed a task force to review the governing policies for Greek affairs.

After the review, Greek life was reinstated at the university on March 1, 2018, with the condition that the fraternities sign off on the updated code of conducts. All of the fraternities at the university signed, except one.

Sam Zablosky, the president of the Kappa Sigma Theta fraternity, said they felt that university’s process “was not entirely fair.”

via Texas State:

“There was some ambiguous stuff that rose some concerns for me,” Zablosky said. “I didn’t want to sign something I wasn’t sure about. When I met with the IFC president, (Jake) Negvesky, and told him I had thoughts of not re-signing with the IFC, that didn’t sit well with the school.”

Some fraternity members said they feel that the new rules have too many restrictions. New implementations include a restricted rushing season, an altered pledge process, mandated training before all social events and monthly reports to be submitted to the Greek Affairs Office.

Seth McNeill, IFC vice president of recruitment and Theta Chi treasurer, said it was important to extend the length of recruitment and shorten the new member period. McNeill said this allows chapters to educate more students about history, creed and values.

This is the latest major Greek life overhaul in the last year, as schools such as Indiana University, the University of Michigan, Ohio State University, Texas State, Florida State, Ball State, Louisiana State and Penn State have all suspended fraternities in the wake of hazing and alcohol deaths.

These reports come amidst similar allegations that have been made against fraternities nationwide, including Sigma Alpha Epsilon at East Carolina University, who was shut down for hazing and the Lamda Chi Alpha chapter at the University of Arkansas which has been accused of taking sexually explicit photographs of women without their permission.

In response to incidents like these, fraternities such Phi Kappa Psi have made numerous changes to their code of conduct in an effort to address the issues that have arisen.

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