The 5 Most Bogus NCAA Violations

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NCAA-violations

The NCAA is investigating the Michigan Wolverines football team following allegations from players that the coaching staff made them practice far longer than NCAA rules allow. Surprisingly, the NCAA’s investigation of “long practices” isn’t even the most ridiculous one that they have done, here are 5 that are definitely up there.

bagel

1. Ineligible Bagel

Earlier this year, the NCAA found 14 rule violations in the University of South Carolina’s basketball program. Among them was giving a student athlete an “impermissible snack.” The snack was a bagel and deemed illegal because it wasn’t breakfast or lunch time. Apparently the NCAA rules strongly discourage the “sharing is caring” policy.

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cigars

2. Don’t Smoke ’em If You Got ’em

In 2005, the Alabama coaching staff celebrated a victory over Tennessee by handing out victory cigars to their players. This was a violation of NCAA rules because the cigars were deemed “an extra benefit.”

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fishing

3. Throw It Back

Earlier this year, the NCAA began to investigate a fishing trip by two Alabama football players that was paid for by a friend of theirs. The friend was in no way associated with the college and wasn’t even an Alabama fan.

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UsedCar copy

4. Take a Hike

Earlier this year, the NCAA launched an investigation of “possible major violations” of the Oklahoma State University baseball team. One of the teams players had received a used car worth less than $5,000 from a family he had been living with, so that he could, you know, get places. How could he do that when he could pay for the car with all of the money his team must be paying him? Oh…wait.

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facebook-ncs

5. Face-Mask

This could be the topper. The NCAA launched an investigation into a “violation” that occured on Facebook when students at North Carolina State organized a Facebook group to convince a top high school basketball recruit to join the Wolfpack. The 703 members of the group committed an NCAA recruiting violation because they were “representatives of the school.”

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Follow Author, Igor Derysh on Twitter! @igorderysh

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COED Writer
COED Writer
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