Ultimate Fight Night Recap: Diaz wins decision, Guida to much for Danzig

SpikeTV and the UFC team up once again to bring a free night of live fights! The Ultimate Fight Night series can sometimes be lackluster. It’s often used to showcase up and coming talent in the UFC that isn’t quite ready for a big pay-per-view. While these card certainly showcased up and comers, ‘lackluster’ is not how COED would describe it.

The entire card showed why the UFC is indeed the premiere MMA organization on the planet at the moment. Smart matchmaking and a complete swelling of talent made this one of the best free fight cards that Spike has ever aired.

The card was headlined by a lightweight bout between the always tough Josh Neer and the ridiculously entertaining Nate Diaz. One half of the legendary Diaz brothers, Nate, the younger brother of Nick, trains at the same camp, boxes the same way, and sports the same slick submission game as his brother. The only difference (they even look alike) is that Nate seems angrier. He ended his last fight flipping the double-bird salute to the audience as he had his opponent caught in a triangle.

In a three round war, both fighters showed an acumen for boxing and grappling. Neer landed effective strikes and landed some big take downs on the Stockton, CA native, and at one point was seconds away from securing a rear naked choke. Everything aligned, both hooks in, arm under chin. Unfortunately Nate Diaz decided he’d like to continue fighting and escaped. That was basically the story of the entire fight. Neer would get something going, Diaz would escape, and land strikes or submission attempts. In the second round, Diaz took Neer down with a bone crunching judo hip toss that sent the crowd into a frenzy. The fight could have ended multiple times throughout every round, but the two fighters showed a true warrior spirit. Diaz finished the third in full mount, landing strikes, and won himself a split decision.

The card also featured 155lb caveman and Chicagoan Clay Guida facing off against ‘Ultimate Fighter’ winner Mac Danzig. Guida is not a fighter. He is a walking problem. If you can’t answer the problem, in your own way, you lose the fight. Danzig is a more technical fighter in almost every aspect. He had better stand-up and submissions and his take down defense is solid. Guida simply out hustled him. He ate the punches, earned his take downs, and when that distance was finally closed, Guida made Danzig pay. Guida hoisted Danzig’s body over his head multiple times, delivering massive, Rampage-esqe slams that caused Danzig’s usually stoic face to grimace in pain and embarrassment. Guida ran over Danzig, quite literally, and won a decision.

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