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A New Study Shows Which Sibling Is Most Likely To Be More Dangerous Behind The Wheel

Younger brothers and sisters oftentimes don’t get the credit they deserve. There’s plenty of widespread societal assumptions stating that they’re inherently less mature than their older siblings merely based upon age. Well, this is just plain wrong and a bit ageist if you ask me (actually very ageist). Welp, good thing we can rely on the wonders of science to cure these stereotypes and generalizations.

A new study compares driving behavior between older and younger siblings, and let’s just say that wisdom doesn’t always come with age.

Privilege Car Insurance surveyed 1,395 drivers and discovered that 89% of older siblings speed, while 35% have already been fined for their driving behavior. The study also shows a huge gap regarding accident rates when it comes to elder and younger siblings. For example, 22 percent of the oldest siblings surveyed had been involved in a minor accident during the past five years, with 15 percent of those accidents being serious. Meanwhile, the youngest siblings surveyed report experiencing much less accidents while behind the wheel. Only 13 percent of the younger siblings were involved in minor accidents, while a mere 4 percent had been experienced a serious collision.

Those young whipper-snappers are also less likely to hog the road when compared to their elder siblings.

Older siblings are apparently bad behind the wheel, according to Privilege Car Insurance. However, first born children specifically appear to be the absolute worst when it comes to using a phone or applying make-up in the driver’s seat. This study revealed that 30 percent of first born siblings have admitted to using their phone while driving, while 17 percent also admit to applying make-up while seated at the wheel.

But who’s really the safest on the road?

Good question. The safest millennial on the road isn’t the older or younger brother/sister. Nope, not by a long shot. The award for best driver on the road goes to the only child. On average, this driver is 36 percent less likely to hold up commuters on the middle or outside lane of a roadway. They are also the least likely to cut off other drivers.

Most Dangerous Driver Sibling Study: Full Story & Details

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    Brian DunlopCOED Writer
    I've been sent out of college, with honors and such, on the search for the American Dream. I'm a Queens native, filtering through the net for the next hit story. I'm a good bro, too. Check out my brother's art page: https://www.instagram.com/foulfacekoala/?hl=en
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