COED’s Awesome Mix, Vol 1.5: Other ’70s Hits For The Galaxy [VIDEOS]

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COED's Awesome Mix, Vol 1.5

Guardians of the Galaxy rocked the box-office this weekend–and it looks like Guardians of the Galaxy: Awesome Mix Vol 1 is going to rock away as the soundtrack of the year. The high concept is that Guardians hero Peter Quill was given an old-fashioned cassette mix tape of ’70s songs shortly before getting kidnapped by a spaceship back in the ’80s. That’s  a very clever way of making sure that Guardians of the Galaxy is a sci-fi epic full of vintage rock and soul tunes.

It’s the musical equivalent of when Quentin Tarantino brought in John Travolta for Pulp Fiction. It seems that Peter Quill’s mother kept her preferred musical tastes to one decade–specifically, covering 1971 to 1979, with one golden oldie from the very end of the 1960s. We like the music an awful lot. It’s just that we might have chosen a few different songs. We know that there might have been budgetary concerns, but here’s COED’s take on the vintage tunes that could’ve made Guardians even greater. And don’t forget that the movie ends with Peter getting that second cassette…

The Sweet: “Fox on the Run”

Peter Quill’s mother started things off with Blue Swede’s “Hooked on a Feeling”–which made for a good trailer, but here’s a stomping glam band that hung around for plenty of hits….

Dwight Twilley Band: “I’m On Fire”

We also like how Peter Quill’s mother followed up Blue Swede with The Raspberries’ “Go All The Way.” That’s a great power-pop song. It’s just not as lost as, say, the amazing Dwight Twilley’s battle cry for the pursuit of adolescent lust…

Shocking Blue: “Venus”

Peter’s mom went back to 1969 for Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit in the Sky,” which is the greatest Christian pop hit ever made by a guy named Greenbaum. We’re going back to 1969 for Shocking Blue’s “Venus”–and they were from The Netherlands’, which kind of makes up for losing Blue Swede…

Roxy Music: “Remake/Remodel”

Peter’s mom seemed to like the more restrained side of David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust period. We admire her going with a deep album track like 1972’s “Moonage Daydream”–but who was opening for Bowie back in 1971? That would be the fine men of Roxy Music, who would need another decade before finally (almost) breaking big in America…

The Marshall Tucker Band: “Can’t You See”

There’s nothing wrong with Elvin Bishop’s “Fooled Around and Fell In Love,” except that the lead singer is the same guy who’d later sing lead on Jefferson Starship’s “We Built This City.” Here’s something a little stronger in country-rocking ’70s balladry…

10cc: “People In Love”

“I’m Not In Love” is a great song, but it wasn’t the only American hit for the quirky English eccentrics of 10cc–and we’d like to put in a plug for their other breathy U.S. song about romantic denial….

The Sylvers: “Boogie Fever”

COED doesn’t have the budget to afford the Jackson 5 and “I Want You Back.” We can, however, relate to the members of the Sylver family, and their tale of disco mayhem taking over the pizzeria…

Golden Earring: “Radar Love”

We guess it’s nice that Redbone gets a plug from Peter Quill’s mom, but “Come and Get Your Love” can’t compare to Golden Earring hitting the road to get some love themselves…

The Quick: “It Won’t Be Long”

We have our doubts about Peter Quill’s mom really being a fan of The Runaways and “Cherry Bomb”–but we can be pretty eclectic, too, so let’s not get too suspicious. There was another rockin’ glam act signed to the Mercury label in 1976, though, and we’d like to give those boys a shot with this Beatles cover. The lead singer would later front The Rembrandts, which means you’ve already heard him sing the theme to Friends about eleven million times….

David Geddes: “Run, Joey, Run”

We’re not sure why Peter Quill’s mother decided to torture him with Rupert Holmes’ “Escape (The Pina Colada Song)”–but we’ve got something worse. And it’s still not as bad as Rupert Holmes’ “Answering Machine”…

The Stylistics: “Betcha By Golly, Wow”

We really like how Peter Quill utilizes The Five Stairsteps’ “O-o-h Child” to save the universe–so we’ll just be respectful and offer this equally sweet and soulful substitute…

The Honey Cone: “One Monkey Don’t Stop No Show”

And finally, it’s hard to think of a closing number as epic as Tammi Terrell’s take on “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”–but consider this great ’70s vocal trio that sang every one of their novelty pop hits in an epic manner…

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