The Biggest Box Office Bombs of 2014 (So Far) [VIDEOS]

By Edit Posted in Entertainment, Movies

Biggest Box Office Bombs of 2014 So Far1

We’re now half-way through 2014–which some movie fans would describe as a year of terrible remakes, unnecessary sequels, and overdone concepts. It’s a world where Transformers: Age of Extinction becomes the year’s biggest box-office hit even while getting the worst reviews. We’re thinking that the critics are going to find some love for Dawn of the Apes as a summer blockbuster, and audiences are going to be pretty excited, too.

But since summer marks the mid-point of the year, let’s take a look at the 2014 productions that seriously bombed with audiences and film critics. There have been some surprise sleepers, and a lot of these Hollywood disasters have their defenders, but we’re looking back at the films that couldn’t find any kind of a real following from regular moviegoers and the critical elite. Check out the biggest biggest box-office blunders (so far) of 2014–and be grateful if you managed to avoid them….

10. Cesar Chavez

Domestic Total Gross: $5,571,497

Budget: $10 Million

A lot of people had high hopes for the first ever biopic of civil rights leader Cesar Chavez, with Michael Pena in his first starring role. Audiences didn’t get excited about the story of a labor organizer, though,and the critics were disappointed in a lack of depth.

9. Brick Mansions

Domestic Total Gross: $20,373,824

Budget: $28 Million

This was Paul Walker’s last completed role before his death, and we all hoped the movie would be awesome. Sadly, this remake of the French film which launched the parkour craze couldn’t manage any momentum.

8. Vampire Academy

Domestic Total Gross: $7,791,979

Budget: $30 Million

This movie pandered to all of the teen hysteria that marked the vampire craze of the past few years–but couldn’t decide if it was a new franchise or a parody. The critics and filmgoers made the harshest decision.

7. Sabotage

Domestic Total Gross: $10,508,518

Budget: $35 Million

This bizarre thriller was looking to become Arnold Schwarzenegger’s most legit comeback project yet–but a nonsensical plot had this tale of crooked cops fizzling at the box office. Not even the international market could save Schwarzenegger this time.

6. RoboCop

Domestic Total Gross: $58,607,007

Budget: $100 Million

There was just too much love for the original RoboCop for this movie to get any attention or respect–especially with a plot that lacked any of the first RoboCop‘s amazing social satire.

5. I, Frankenstein

Domestic Total Gross: $19,075,290

Budget: $65 Million

The year’s first big bomb tried to turn the original Frankenstein monster into an action hero, and pretty much ensured that any January release will be treated very suspiciously for several more decades to come.

4. The Legend of Hercules

Domestic Total Gross: $18,848,538

Budget: $70 Million

This sad attempt to get the jump on Dwayne Johnson’s upcoming Hercules was a real embarrassment for everyone concerned–but especially for former A-list director Renny Harlin.

3. Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return

Domestic Total Gross: $8,437,664

Budget: $70 Million

A voice cast of faded stars (and Lea Michele) already made this musical sound cheap, and even the kiddies could tell that the low-budget animation was strictly from 1993.

2. Pompeii

Domestic Total Gross: $23,219,74

Budget: $100 Million

If you’re unhappy with the success of Transformers: Age of Extinction, then take some comfort in how this disastrous historical disaster movie proved that audiences can’t always get conned by epic destruction in 3D.

1. Transcendence

Domestic Total Gross: $23,022,309

Budget: $100 Million

This weekend marks the the anniversary of the release of last summer’s biggest flop–that being The Lone Ranger--and here we are looking at 2014′s biggest bomb to date as another Johnny Depp starring vehicle. To be fair, though, this convoluted sci-fi “thriller” would’ve been a disaster with any male in the lead. And we won’t even mention Dark Shadows in the summer of 2012…

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